SEC Releases Statement On What Happened At The End Of Iron Bowl 1st Half
© Ray Carlin-USA TODAY Sports
The SEC has explained the reasoning behind the clock management before halftime of Saturday's Iron Bowl. The play in question was when they added one second to the clock which led to an Auburn field goal at the end of the half. The SEC's statement sent to AL.com...
quote:

“At the end of the 1st half in the Alabama vs Auburn game, during a play that resulted in a first down inbounds, the game clock went to 0:00. Replay stopped the game to review the clock. The decision from the Instant Replay Official was that video evidence showed there was 1 second on the clock when the player was down so the clock operator was instructed to put 1 second back on the game clock. The referee came back out to the line of scrimmage and informed both teams that the clock would start on the ready for play. The referee got back in position and blew his whistle and wound the clock. The snap was off before the clock went to 0:00.”
(The Spun)
Filed Under: SEC Football

Comments

66 Comments
Right. "the clock would start on the ready for play." However, the clock was supposed to start on spotting of the ball and setting of the chains, not "on the ready for play." Without the refs assistance there is no way Auburn could have arrived to the ball, lined up it's team and snapped within one second. Instead the refs de facto "froze time", allowing the entire team to line up, get ready, and snap on the whistle.
Reply10 months
Why did the clock start on the snap instead of when the ref placed the ball as it normally would on a 1st down? Because there is no way in the world a ref placed the ball and got out of the way in time for a snap in 1 second.
Reply10 months
Only Saban doesn't understand that ruling. It just wasn't fair along with that trick play Gus ran at the end of the game.
Reply10 months
They are just stating what happened. We all know what happened. They are not addressing the actual issue. By ruling the clock ran out, they actually helped Auburn, the stoppage and replay was just in effect a free timeout for them, allowing them to run the play when they obviously never would have otherwise.
Reply10 months
I’m still awaiting the SEC to explain the officiating in the LSU-Auburn 2006 game.
Reply10 months
It’s by the rules as they currently exist but in future situations similar to this the rule needs to be no substitutions on either side or something similar because there is zero chance Auburn gets another snap off without the review. That being said - kudos to auburn for being well coached and getting it off.
Reply10 months
It's just unfair I tell ya. Alabama didn't get their way, it's not fair.
Reply10 months
WTF are they not contradicting themselves here.
Reply10 months
What do you find contradictory?
10 months
Fair? What's fair? Tough shit! There's no remedy for what happened. What? You want the referees to invent a rule there on the spot to satisfy Saban and Alabama fans? GTFO! It's done! Bama Lost!
Reply10 months
Can anyone explain how Auburn gets this play off we one second left, but we don't at Auburn in 2016?
Reply10 months
In retrospect, be glad it went down the way it did.
10 months
Auburn knew where the ball would be placed and the TO gave them time to be set and snap the ball at the whistle. In 2016 the penalty and confusion didn't give LSU the same advantage.
10 months
Auburn was set ready to go, where the LSU was running around and not ready. simple as that
10 months
Just to play devils advocate, could you imagine the amount of crying from LSU about the refs and how the SEC is fixed had this happened to them?
Reply10 months
I love that Nick exploded on the sideline. However, it was justified. the replay was done to correct an error. However, had there been no error, there is no way Aub gets lined up and snaps the ball in time, especially with the FG team.
10 months
Completely irrelevant.
10 months
Your head coach literally said that a play was unfair because he got out coached at the end to the game. A dude who has had everything go his way for the last 10 years is upset because old Gus got one over on him. I wouldn’t be concerned with other fan bases right now if I were you
10 months
I believe that this virtually and literally gave Auburn an extra timeout they did not have. Therefore, 1 of 2 things should happen in this instance. 1) Be like the NFL and rule that their should be a 10 second runoff in this instance -OR- 2) Make them enforce that the same offense remain on the field for the 1 second, which still gives auburn a chance at a hail mary (still giving them an extra timeout).
Reply10 months
isnt the rule in the nfl that if a review is made inside of a minute and the clock would have been moving there is a 10 second run off. seems like that rule can be applied to college
Reply10 months
Clock doesn’t stop for a first down in the nfl
10 months
In reality, if they subbed their kicker in, the other team would be awarded time to substitute. Which would take at over one second
10 months
Maybe it can.
10 months
I did not realize this claim of unfairness was only half time. This did not cost Alabama the game.
Reply10 months
Three free points in a 3 point game? Cost us OT at least. Bama's mistakes and penalties cost us the game, without which bama wins by 20 at least, but shitty ref decisions didn't help. End of game they fricked up too but that's less clear cut. Also, what a strange time to start calling holding (negated a TD) considering the way the auburn LSU game was called. Guess only bama holds.
10 months
Get over it! The dynasty is dead!
10 months
I hate Bama but they got screwed. Plain and simple. Had they stopped with one second left there is no way Auburn would gave been able to get the kick off.
Reply10 months
Alabama wasn't screwed. It was an unlucky break that went in Auburn's favor.
10 months
SEC office needs to explain why they let Auburn substitute kicking team, placed the ball, got the centers hand on the ball, etc etc before restarting the clock. Clock should have started again the instant the ref placed the ball like on any other first down play. The clock only stops on first down so the officials can move the chains, if they had called it a first down in the first place and the normal procedure had followed there was zero chance auburn could have gotten the kicking team in, lined up, and gotten a kick off.
Reply10 months
Had they run the play the way you mention, Auburn wouldn't have had the time to run ANYTHING.
10 months
It was an officials timeout. The clock starts when they blow the whistle.
10 months
that's a loophole in the replay rule. They need to either have a clock runoff, or require that the players stay on the field, at the prior line of scrimmage until the refs whistles the ball ready for play after the review. The current rule gave Auburn a free timeout and a free substitution to get the FG unit on the field and ready for the snap.
10 months
This is a terrible take from the SEC. They should have simply apologized for the way it was handled. No one outside of homers on this website thought that was handled appropriately.
Reply10 months
It was handled by rule.
10 months
It's convenient how nearly the same scenario went the other way in their 2016 LSU game.
Reply10 months
When I played my coaches always told be to be dominant enough that an officiating call not going our way won't cost us the game.
Reply10 months
sure, but many games are close, and these types of call make a difference. It's silly to think you can dominate every game.
10 months
I don’t have a Dawg in this fight, but Bama got jobbed. It’s ridiculous for replay (who’s sole purpose in life is to “get the call right”) to create a scenario where getting it right actually makes it wrong. Refs shoulda left it alone given that AU was out of timeouts.
Reply10 months
There is some sense in arguing that the refs could/should have used discretion and not called for the replay. But that's not what they did. They called for the replay and everything else that followed was done by the book.
10 months
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