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© Christopher Hanewinckel-USA TODAY Sports
Alabama athletic director Greg Byrne and former head coach Nick Saban joined a roundtable discussion at Capitol Hill on Tuesday about the issues surrounding NIL in college athletics.

Here's what they had to say:

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Filed Under: Alabama Sports
12 Comments
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Drizzt1 month
NIL made Saban quit. His bagman wasn’t the only one paying for players anymore.
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cajunmud1 month
I haven't been paying attention, A-Z, on the subject...just been bitching about it mostly...haha. But it seems the easiest route to take would be the NFL model. We already have that blueprint to follow, contracts, salary caps, free agency etc.. It works pretty good. Let's start there and tweak it to the taxpayer-funded schools.
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GoodTalkRuss1 month
But you still have the same problem. You could have a controlled salary plan that applies to every university, but that doesn't control NIL. NFL players can make unlimited money off of their names outside of their contract. That's the issue at hand now. The ncaa gave players the ability to profit off their names. I'm not sure they have any chance in hell of being able to go back in time now and get a do over. This all boils down to the ncaa and universities were selfish as hell and said "we aren't sharing our money, let the fans pay them". In that simple model the ncaa relinquished all of its power.
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tirebiter1 month
Funny how you don't hear these issues from college baseball players/families. Oh, yeah, those 11.7 schollies weren't cutting it to begin with. Football revenues drive everything in the SEC. How many head coaches in the NFL are paid $10M annually vs SEC HC's??
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TFH1 month
Let schools decide if they want to field a professional team or not and then have two separate leagues, pros and student athletes. Everyone wins.
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ksdolfan1 month
The problem isn't the NCAA or government, it's agents and lawyers. Every time a rule implemented someone takes them to court.
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TouchdownTony1 month
For NIL to be regulated there will have to be proof that it is hurting the economics and the quality standards at any university.
Good luck. The "amateurism" excuse is dead.
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GusAU1 month
As a lifelong, diehard fan of college sports, I’m actually glad that Saban and Byrne are trying to fight this. I think Saban is spot on in his comments here.

I don’t care if he’s a “bammer”. He is at least fighting to preserve the very thing that the vast majority here love and that is the actual reason that this forum exists.
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TouchdownTony1 month
He is doing , and has been saying things that coaches, fans and AD"s all over the country feel but for some reason won't take a stand.
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Kracka1 month
That's because he has won already and doesn't have to anymore to secure anything. His legacy is sealed. The reason why other coaches and AD's aren't saying anything is because they have to win, and win now, or they'll lose sponsors, they'll lose recruits, and they'll lose their jobs. Which means losing $$$$.
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GusAU1 month
To Kracka:

I'm don't see what your post has to do with me saying that I like Saban and Byrne speaking up. Just because other coaches or ADs find reasons not to speak up (legitimate or not) does not mean that two people who know how the system works cannot speak up and try to get people to understand that changes need to be made or college sports will alienate the very people that provide all of that $$$$ you talk about. If the fans go away, so will the viewer base for the networks that are paying these exorbitant prices to televise the games.
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Timeoday1 month
Goooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooberment is about to really mess it up!!
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